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Dave Resop

Dave Resop CNC TestimonialDave Resop says, “I had always had an interest in machine tool technology, and I decided it was a good time to get training in that field when my job of 20 years disappeared.”  Gateway’s CNC Production Technician program can provide this training in just two semesters.

Students prepare to be machine operators, computerized numerical control (CNC) operators, or set-up persons in a machine shop or tool and die shop. 

Dave recalls great relationships with instructors and was impressed with the work experience they brought to the classroom. As graduation neared, a Gateway instructor helped Dave land an interview with Hypro, Inc., Waterford.  Impressed by his skills – and his instructor’s strong recommendation – the company hired Dave, not as an entry-level technician but as a manufacturing engineer.  

“The hands-on work I had done at Gateway correlates very well with the real-life processes I find at work,” he says.  “I really enjoy what I do.  Each day brings something different, and I’m always learning new things.”  

He’s responsible for “engineering changes” at Hypro – programming the computer-controlled tools used to machine various parts.  About 400 engineering changes are made every year.

Dave’s affiliation with Gateway didn’t end when he joined Hypro.  He has served on the advisory committee for the CNC Production Technician program for several years, sharing his perspective on manufacturing with Gateway instructors and administrators.  “It’s a great way to bring additional real-world information into the program,” he says.

Speaking of the real world, “There’s a real need for machine-tool and CNC operators,” says Dave, “and you can make good money.”  He estimates starting wages at $10 to $18 per hour, depending on experience.